Mamatoga Investigates: When Good Kids Go Weird

Both of my brothers have birthdays in February within four days of each other, so this time of year I'm thinking of them a lot, and remembering what it was like growing up with the two of them. Chris is six years older than me, and like most kids with older siblings, I wound up watching television shows and movie that he liked that were probably a little "age inappropriate" for me at the time. Case in point: Dukes of Hazzard. Most likely not what I, as a five or six year old girl, would have picked but nonetheless I watched it because Chris watched it. I knew that solely based on the fact that he was older that it was worthwhile television and I didn't want to miss a minute. And even though I didn't really understand most of what was going on I quickly became a huge fan. This was definitely the first weird part, as a kindergarten aged girl growing up in suburban New Jersey I know I couldn't have been their target demographic. Luckily for me I liked the boy characters (Bo and Luke Duke) rather than the somewhat questionable Daisy, which probably wouldn't have been the best role model for me. My brother Teddy and I began to "play" Dukes of Hazzard and one of our favorite games was to try to get into our car through the window, Dukes of Hazzard style. We didn't have a car even nearly as awesome as the General Lee, and my Mom was never thrilled with us trying to climb our way into our station wagon (I couldn't quite execute it as smoothly as Bo or Luke) but she humored us for the most part and I always felt super cool getting into the car that way. However, I didn't let the Dukes of Hazzard thing stop with the car entry method. I became the proud owner of my very own Boss Hogg figurine. Described on Wikipedia as the "greedy, unethical commissioner of Hazzard County" Boss Hogg was the bad guy on Dukes of Hazzard, always wearing an all white suit and smoking cigars. I'm not sure what it was in particular that I liked about Boss Hogg but I became attached to this little action figure. I would try to include him in all kinds of games, even trying to make him part of the Barbie crowd even though he wasn't even close to their size. There I would be, having a play date and I would bring out Boss Hogg and would get confused looks from my playmate. Reluctantly they would let me incorporate Boss into whatever little setup we had going, but no one else ever really accepted Boss as much as I did. He pretty much didn't go with any other toys I had, or any other games, but I cherished this strange little toy with his absurd little white suit, and I adored the tiny white hat and would get bent out of shape if it couldn't be located.

However, just as quickly as the Boss Hogg obsession started, it waned, and he was cast off to the bottom of the toy chest as is the habit with fickle young kids. To this day though I still think about that little figurine and how much I loved it. Maybe I loved it because it was different from all of the other toys I had, maybe it was because it was a perfect pint sized replica of a real person I saw on television. There really is no way of knowing what was going on in my little psyche at that point, but it remains one of my most treasured toys and memories from growing up, so much so that I have toyed with (pun intended) the idea of buying myself one now as an adult but have resisted so far knowing just how weird that whole thing might be. But it brings me to the question readers, was I alone in this weird toy obsession? Or did you have a strange toy yourself? Does your little one have a somewhat different toy they have latched on to inexplicably? Please tell me I'm not alone! In the meantime, I'll get this song stuck in your head too so at least I won't be alone in THAT...

Just the good ol' boys, Never meanin' no harm...